Taylor Swift pulls 1989 album from ‘Shocking’ Apple Music

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Taylor Swift has pulled her album 1989 from Apple Music, Apple’s new streaming music service, and blasted the company.

In an open letter to Apple, Swift said she was withholding the record as she was unhappy with the three-month free trial offered to subscribers.

“I’m sure you are aware that Apple Music will be offering a free 3 month trial to anyone who signs up for the service. I’m not sure you know that Apple Music will not be paying writers, producers, or artists for those three months. I find it to be shocking, disappointing, and completely unlike this historically progressive and generous company.” she wrote.

Swift continued:

“These are not the complaints of a spoiled, petulant child. These are the echoed sentiments of every artist, writer and producer in my social circles who are afraid to speak up publicly because we admire and respect Apple so much. We simply do not respect this particular call.”

“I realize that Apple is working towards a goal of paid streaming. I think that is beautiful progress. We know how astronomically successful Apple has been and we know that this incredible company has the money to pay artists, writers and producers for the 3 month trial period’ even if it is free for the fans trying it out.

Three months is a long time to go unpaid, and it is unfair to ask anyone to work for nothing. I say this with love, reverence, and admiration for everything else Apple has done. I hope that soon I can join them in the progression towards a streaming model that seems fair to those who create this music. I think this could be the platform that gets it right.

It is not the first time Swift has spoken out against streaming music – she pulled her entire catalogue from Spotify last November and had refused to offer 1989 on streaming services, saying the business had “shrunk the numbers of paid album sales drastically”.

She ended her letter by calling on Apple to change its policy, suggesting she would reinstate her album on the service if the company changed its mind.

“We don’t ask you for free iPhones. Please don’t ask us to provide you with our music for no compensation.”

The rest of Swift’s back catalogue will remain available on Apple Music when it launches on 30 June. It will cost $9.99 (£6.30) per month in the US for one person or $14.99 for families.

Apple has yet to comment on the issue.

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